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date: 02 July 2022

Situational Action Theory: Toward a Dynamic Theory of Crime and Its Causeslocked

Situational Action Theory: Toward a Dynamic Theory of Crime and Its Causeslocked

  • Per-Olof H. WikströmPer-Olof H. WikströmInstitute of Criminology, University of Cambridge

Summary

Situational Action Theory (SAT) is a general, dynamic, and mechanism-based theory of crime and its causes. It is general because it proposes to explain all kinds of crime (and rule-breaking more generally). It is dynamic because it centers on analyzing crime and its changes as the outcome of the interactions between people and their environments. It is mechanism-based because its explanation focuses on identifying key basic processes involved in crime causation.

SAT analyzes crime as moral actions and its explanation focuses on three basic and interrelated explanatory mechanisms: the perception–choice process (the situational mechanism) that explains why crime events happen; selection-mechanisms that explain why criminogenic situations occur; and mechanisms of emergence that explain why people develop and change their crime propensities (psychosocial processes), and why places develop and change their criminogeneity (socioecological processes).

Subjects

  • Criminological Theory

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