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Feminist Theory  

Rachel Bridges Whaley

Feminist theory is not one theory but a set of theories on the relationships between gender, the gender order, and gender stratification and criminal offending, victimization, and criminal legal system (CLS) processing. Feminist criminology is distinct from criminology because it embraces an understanding of gender, race, class, and sexual identities and their system level counterparts (i.e., stratification systems based on gender, race, social class, and sexuality) as key organizing forces in society that have multiplicative implications for criminality, victimization, crime rates, and CLS practices. Feminist criminology is a very large field with a 50-year history and is a theoretical, empirical, and activist enterprise.

Article

Critical Criminologies  

Walter S. DeKeseredy

There is no single critical criminology. Rather, there are critical criminologies with different histories, methods, theories, and political perspectives. However, critical criminology is often defined as a perspective that views the major sources of crime as the unequal class, race/ethnic, and gender relations that control our society. Critical criminologists oppose prisons and other draconian means of social control. Their main goal is major radical and cultural change, but they recognize that these transitions will not occur in the current neoliberal era. Hence, most critical criminologists propose short-term anticrime policies and practices and fundamental social, economic, and political transformations, such as a change from a capitalist economy to one based on more socialist principles.