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date: 24 June 2021

Narrative Criminologylocked

Narrative Criminologylocked

  • Lois PresserLois PresserDepartment of Sociology, University of Tennessee at Knoxville

Summary

Narrative criminology is a relatively new theoretical perspective that highlights the influence of stories on harmful actions and patterns of action. Narrative criminology researchers study stories themselves, rather than what stories report on, for effects. Narrative criminology takes a constitutive view of stories as opposed to the representational view that is rather more common within criminology. Hence a hallmark of the perspective is its bracketing of the accuracy of the stories under investigation. Stories legitimize conduct, compel action, and induce detachment, however fanciful they may be. Narrative criminologists analyze the role of stories in active harm-doing, passive complicity, desistance from offending, and resistance to harm. The field of narrative criminology has evolved rapidly.

Subjects

  • Criminological Theory
  • Critical Criminology
  • International Crime

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