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date: 24 January 2021

Global Spillovers in a Low Interest Rate Environmentlocked

  • Sushant AcharyaSushant AcharyaResearch and Statistics Group, Federal Reserve Bank of New York
  •  and Paolo PesentiPaolo PesentiResearch and Statistics Group, Federal Reserve Bank of New York; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Summary

Global policy spillovers can be defined as the effect of policy changes in one country on economic outcomes in other countries. The literature has mainly focused on monetary policy interdependencies and has identified three channels through which policy spillovers can materialize. The first is the expenditure-shifting channel—a monetary expansion in one country depreciates its currency, making its goods cheaper relative to those in other countries and shifting global demand toward domestic tradable goods. The second is the expenditure-changing channel—expansionary monetary policy in one country raises both domestic and foreign expenditure. The third is the financial spillovers channel—expansionary monetary policy in one country eases financial conditions in other economies. The literature generally finds that the net transmission effect is positive but small. However, estimated spillovers vary widely across countries and over time. In the aftermath of the Great Recession, the policy debate has devoted special attention to the possibility that the magnitude and sign of international spillovers might have changed in an environment of low interest rates worldwide, as the expenditure-shifting channel becomes more relevant when the effective lower bound reduces the effectiveness of conventional monetary policies.

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