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date: 18 April 2024

COVID-19 and Mental Health: Natural Experiments of the Costs of Lockdownslocked

COVID-19 and Mental Health: Natural Experiments of the Costs of Lockdownslocked

  • Climent Quintana-DomequeCliment Quintana-DomequeDepartment of Economics, University of Exeter
  •  and Jingya ZengJingya ZengDepartment of Economics, University of Exeter

Summary

The global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has been profound, leaving a significant imprint on physical health, the economy, and mental well-being. Researchers have undertaken empirical investigations across different countries, with a primary focus on understanding the association between lockdown measures—an essential public health intervention—and mental health. These studies aim to discern the causal effect of lockdowns on mental well-being. Three notable studies have adopted natural experiments to explore the causal effect of lockdowns on mental health in diverse countries. Despite variations in their research methodologies, these studies collectively support the conclusion that lockdowns have had detrimental consequences on mental health. Furthermore, they reveal that the intensity of these negative effects varies among distinct population groups. Certain segments of the population, such as women, have borne a more profound burden of the mental health costs associated with lockdown measures. In light of these findings, it becomes imperative to consider the implications for mental health when implementing public health interventions, especially during crises like the COVID-19 pandemic. While rigorous measures like lockdowns are essential for safeguarding public health, striking a balance with robust mental health support policies becomes crucial to mitigating the adverse impacts on mental well-being.

Subjects

  • Econometrics, Experimental and Quantitative Methods
  • Health, Education, and Welfare Economics
  • Public Economics and Policy

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