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date: 29 October 2020

The Biological Foundations of Economic Preferenceslocked

  • Nikolaus RobalinoNikolaus RobalinoDepartment of Economics, Rochester Institute of Technology
  •  and Arthur RobsonArthur RobsonDepartment of Economics, Simon Fraser University

Summary

Modern economic theory rests on the basic assumption that agents’ choices are guided by preferences. The question of where such preferences might have come from has traditionally been ignored or viewed agnostically. The biological approach to economic behavior addresses the issue of the origins of economic preferences explicitly. This approach assumes that economic preferences are shaped by the forces of natural selection. For example, an important theoretical insight delivered thus far by this approach is that individuals ought to be more risk averse to aggregate than to idiosyncratic risk. Additionally the approach has delivered an evolutionary basis for hedonic and adaptive utility and an evolutionary rationale for “theory of mind.” Related empirical work has studied the evolution of time preferences, loss aversion, and explored the deep evolutionary determinants of long-run economic development.

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