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date: 30 November 2022

Changing Global Gender Involvement in Higher Education Participationlocked

Changing Global Gender Involvement in Higher Education Participationlocked

  • Miriam E. DavidMiriam E. DavidUniversity College London

Summary

The global expansion of higher education since the last quarter of the 20th century reflects political and socioeconomic developments, including opening up economic opportunities and addressing neoliberal agendas such as corporatization, digitization, individualization, and marketization. This process of the so-called massification of higher education has also been called academic capitalism, whereby business models predominate what was once considered a public good and a form of liberal arts education. These transformations have implications for questions of equal opportunity and social justice in regard to gender and sexuality linked to diversity, race, and social class, or intersectionality. Transformations include involvement and participation for students, academics, faculty, and researchers. From a feminist perspective, the various transformations have not increased equality or equity but have instead reinforced notions of male power, misogyny and patriarchy, and social class and privilege, despite the massive increase in involvement of women as students and academics through policies of widening access or participation. The new models of global higher education exacerbate rather than erode inequalities of power and prestige between regions, institutions, and gendered, classed, and raced individuals.

Subjects

  • Education, Change, and Development
  • Education, Cultures, and Ethnicities
  • Educational Politics and Policy
  • Educational Purposes and Ideals
  • Globalization, Economics, and Education
  • Education, Gender, and Sexualities

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