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date: 30 November 2022

Curriculum Studies, Critical Geography, and Critical Spatial Theorylocked

Curriculum Studies, Critical Geography, and Critical Spatial Theorylocked

  • Robert HelfenbeinRobert HelfenbeinLoyola University Maryland
  •  and Gabriel HuddlestonGabriel HuddlestonTexas Christian University

Summary

During the late 20th and early 21st centuries, spatial terms have emerged and proliferated in academic circles, finding application in several disciplines extending beyond formal geography. Critical geography, a theoretical addition to the home discipline of geography as opposed to being a new discipline in itself, has seen application in many other disciplines, mostly represented by what is collectively called social theory (i.e., sociology, cultural studies, political science, and literature). The application of critical spatial theory to educational theory in general, and curriculum theorizing in particular, points to new trajectories for both critical geographers and curriculum theorists. The growth of these two formations have coincided with the changes in the curriculum studies field, especially as it relates to the Reconceptualization of that field during the 1970s. In terms of critical spatial theory especially, the exploration of how we conceptualize place and space differently has allowed curriculum studies scholars to think more expansively about education, schools, pedagogy, and curriculum. More specifically, it has allowed a more fluid understanding of how curriculum is formed and shaped over time by framing the spatial as something beyond a “taken-for-granted” fact of our lives. The combination of spatial theory and curriculum studies has produced a myriad of explorations to see how oppression works in everyday spaces. The hope inherent in this work is that if we can understand how space is (re)produced with inherent inequities, we can produce spaces, especially educative ones, that are more just and equitable.

Subjects

  • Curriculum and Pedagogy
  • Education, Cultures, and Ethnicities
  • Educational Theories and Philosophies
  • Globalization, Economics, and Education
  • Education and Society

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