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date: 08 December 2022

Climate Change and Worldview Transformation in Finnish Education Policylocked

Climate Change and Worldview Transformation in Finnish Education Policylocked

  • Harriet ZilliacusHarriet ZilliacusUniversity of Helsinki Faculty of Educational Sciences
  •  and Lili-Ann WolffLili-Ann WolffUniversity of Helsinki Faculty of Educational Sciences

Summary

The climate crisis calls for changes in all areas of human life. One such area is the education sector, which needs to be the target of urgent reform to be able to support these crucial changes. International sustainability policies call for transformative changes in worldviews that may inspire new ways of thinking and acting. Worldview transformation means a major change in deep-rooted ways of viewing the world that results in long-lasting changes in individuals’ sense of self, their perception of their relationship to the world, and even their entire way of being. Worldviews interface with perceptions of issues like climate change in ways that are frequently overlooked. The climate crisis demands a reorientation and transformation of worldviews, a change in which education can play a pivotal role. Therefore, the crisis also calls for rapid educational policy reforms. A central question is how to make worldview transformation related to sustainability visible in education policy. The general school education curricula in Finland (Grades 1–12) express sustainability as a core aim. However, it is debatable whether educational policy such as the Finnish curricula can promote worldview transformation. Contesting policy objectives and gaps between policy and practice can prevent education from dealing effectively with large worldview quandaries such as the climate crisis. In addition, unclear relationships between research and policy are fundamental obstacles during policy development. Finally, an overriding concern in policy is the lack of focus on urgent global dilemmas; consequently, it does not per se promote learning that could lead to radical change.

Subjects

  • Curriculum and Pedagogy
  • Educational Politics and Policy
  • Educational Purposes and Ideals

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