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date: 10 December 2022

TACKLE: Supporting Learning and Identity Formation in a Native American Communitylocked

TACKLE: Supporting Learning and Identity Formation in a Native American Communitylocked

  • Lorraine Orosco, Lorraine OroscoEducation Department Executive Director at San Pasqual Band of Mission Indians
  • Olga VásquezOlga VásquezUniversity of California San Diego
  •  and Charles UnderwoodCharles UnderwoodExecutive Director (Retired), University of California Berkeley, Graduate School of Education, University-Community Links

Summary

Identity development involves complex processes through which individuals enhance their senses and come to understand themselves. This follows in the contextual state of the various cultural demands and the norms of the society. The development of identity could be viewed as a process that is crucial to adolescents and that enables individuals in transiting from childhood dependency into adults responsible of their needs, aspirations, interests, and desires. The process of transition includes a cognitive reorganization in the way the youth think and their relation to other individuals as they mature. Identity development is often associated with adolescence, but it is a continuous process throughout adulthood. It creates a sense of belonging in a bigger and contextual cultural transition. In Native America, universities and indigenous communities have had collaborative work to support learning and identity development among the communities. It has, however, had its share of challenges for a long time as the collaborative processes are complex in nature. One of the collaborative processes in the Native American community was the Technology And Culture Kumeyaay Literacy Education (TACKLE). The historical development of TACKLE as a university–community partnership is described in terms of the emergence of two key strategies—participatory collaborative activity and context embedded change—which came to guide the partners’ interactions as they worked together to bridge their cultural differences in developing the TACKLE program.

Subjects

  • Alternative and Non-formal Education 
  • Education, Cultures, and Ethnicities

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