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date: 22 October 2021

Gender, Education, and Immigrant Children in the United Stateslocked

Gender, Education, and Immigrant Children in the United Stateslocked

  • Bic Ngo, Bic NgoUniversity of Minnesota
  • Nimo AbdiNimo AbdiOhio State University
  •  and Diana ChandaraDiana ChandaraUniversity of Minnesota

Summary

Education research has long highlighted gender disparities in the academic achievement of women and men. At the dawn of the 20th century, men attained higher levels of education than women. By the 21st century, women from all racial groups achieved higher levels of education than men. Likewise, among the children of post-1965 “new immigrants,” female students have higher levels of educational attainment than male students. While gender has remained important as a domain of analysis for understanding disparities in education, analyses of the significance of gender in the education of immigrant children have focused primarily on differences in gender norms and expectations of immigrant groups from those of dominant culture in the United States. Such an emphasis disregards the social, cultural, and political dynamics of acculturation and adaptation where gender is shaped by the ethnic family, race and racialization, and religion, among other things. The “caring,” translational work that Mexican American girls do for parents, the racialized gender construction of Southeast Asian American male students as Other (not male), and the Islamophobia faced by Somali American female students wearing hijabs make salient family obligations, race, and religious identity, respectively, in the educational experiences and outcomes of female and male immigrant students. Considerations of gender in the education of immigrant children in the United States necessitate an intersectional analysis that puts gender in conversation with social factors and institutions.

Subjects

  • Education, Cultures, and Ethnicities
  • Education and Society
  • Education, Gender, and Sexualities

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