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date: 24 July 2021

Emotions in Social-Historical Educational Contextslocked

Emotions in Social-Historical Educational Contextslocked

  • Paul A. Schutz, Paul A. SchutzUniversity of Arizona
  • Sharon L. NicholsSharon L. NicholsThe University of Texas at San Antonio
  •  and Sofia BahenaSofia BahenaThe University of Texas at San Antonio

Summary

After two decades of research on emotions in education we have come to understand little about the relationship of teachers and their instructional decision-making and students and their motivation and learning. Most of what we know about emotions stems from studies that look specifically at students and their approach to learning tasks as well as teachers and how they grapple with the stress of teaching and the emotional experiences of working with students. However, we know less about how emotions manifest in varying social-historical educational contexts. When it comes to students, we know that emotions can influence students’ adoption of self-regulation strategies and their subsequent learning outcomes. For example, pleasant emotions tend to be related with effective learning strategies, whereas unpleasant emotions such as anxiety and boredom can reduce motivation and academic achievement. Importantly, these relationships are not consistent throughout the literature, and evidence suggests that, in some cases, anxiety can be motivating for some students. When it comes to teachers, there are two types of research areas. First are studies about how teachers handle unpleasant experiences in an effort to better understand teacher burnout. Second are studies that try to understand the role of emotions and pleasant and unpleasant experiences for newer teachers and how they inform emergent professional identities. More research is needed to understand how emotions play out in the classroom so that we can better support teachers and students and create effective intervention programs aimed at reducing the emotional stress of teaching and learning.

Subjects

  • Cognition, Emotion, and Learning
  • Education, Cultures, and Ethnicities
  • Educational Systems
  • Education and Society

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