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date: 01 December 2022

Optimal and Real-Time Control of Water Infrastructureslocked

Optimal and Real-Time Control of Water Infrastructureslocked

  • Ronald van Nooijen, Ronald van NooijenFaculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology
  • Demetris KoutsoyiannisDemetris KoutsoyiannisDepartment of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, National Technical University of Athens School of Civil Engineering
  •  and Alla KolechkinaAlla KolechkinaDelft University of Technology

Summary

Humanity has been modifying the natural water cycle by building large-scale water infrastructure for millennia. For most of that time, the principles of hydraulics and control theory were only imperfectly known. Moreover, the feedback from the artificial system to the natural system was not taken into account, either because it was too small to notice or took too long to appear. In the 21st century, humanity is all too aware of the effects of our adaptation of the environment to our needs on the planetary system as a whole. It is necessary to see the environment, both natural and hman-made as one integrated system. Moreover, due to the legacy of the past, the behaviour of the man-madeparts of this system needs to be adapted in a way that leads to a sustainable ecosystem. The water cycle plays a central role in that ecosystem. It is therefore essential that the behaviour of existing and planned water infrastructure fits into the natural system and contributes to its well-being. At the same time, it must serve the purpose for which it was constructed. As there are no natural feedbacks to govern its behaviour, it will be necessary to create such feedbacks, possibly in the form of real-time control systems. To do so, it would be beneficial if all persons involved in the decision process that establishes the desired system behaviour understand the basics of control systems in general and their application to different water systems in particular. This article contains a discussion of the prerequisites for and early development of automatic control of water systems, an introduction to the basics of control theory with examples, a short description of optimal control theory in general, a discussion of model predictive control in water resource management, an overview of key aspects of automatic control in water resource management, and different types of applications. Finally, some challenges faced by practitioners are mentioned.

Subjects

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Management and Planning
  • Quantitative Analysis and Tools

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