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Updated references; new and expanded sections; commodification section removed; section on ‘individuals as commodities, consumers and political actors’ removed; revised areas for future research.

Updated on 25 February 2019. The previous version of this content can be found here.
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date: 18 November 2019

Summary and Keywords

International information and communication have become central cornerstones for global economic, political, social, and cultural actors, issues, structures, and processes. Accordingly, various social science disciplines have become interested in understanding international communication’s economic properties and also produced empirical evidence demonstrating its remarkable impact on global economic development. Subsequently, the relationship between technological evolution and the evolving economics of international communication has become of central importance to the analysis of international communication. Of particular relevance in this context is digitization’s impact on information and communication technologies and related digital conversion processes of once separated media and business sectors. In this context, the constantly evolving economic and technological properties of international information and communication systems and the economic opportunities/challenges they pose have also motivated or forced individuals, business enterprises, states, as well as international organizations to pursue structural and policy changes in order to reap the potential benefits of international information and communication.

Keywords: e-government, entertainment technologies, global knowledge society and information society, history of international communications studies, information and communication revolution and international relations, information technologies and the global political economy, international communication regimes, Internet governance, political economy of intellectual property, technology and international relations

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