Show Summary Details

Page of

Printed from Oxford Research Encyclopedias, International Studies. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a single article for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 25 November 2020

Gendering Human Security: How Gender Theory Is Reflected and Challenged in Civil-Military Cooperationlocked

  • Gunhild Hoogensen GjørvGunhild Hoogensen GjørvCentre for Peace Studies (CPS), Arctic University of Norway
  •  and Kirsti StuvøyKirsti StuvøyDepartment of International Environment and Development Studies, Norwegian University of Life Sciences

Summary

Gendering human security is useful for making explicit the role of practice and actors, and the power relations between them, attributed through socialized and naturalized characteristics of the feminine and masculine. It offers analytical and empirical insights that release human security discourses from the stranglehold that a state-based, militarized security perspective has thus far had on the definition of security as a whole. A gender-based human security analysis reveals what human security means when understood through the power and practices of domination and marginalization, and more specifically the extent to which the militaries are capable of contributing to human security today. In feminist approaches as well as many human security perspectives, security has been delinked from the state and discussed in terms of other referent objects. Feminist and human security share a “bottom-up” approach to security analyses, but feminists have identified a gender blindness in human security theory. Gender is a primary identity that contributes to the social context in which the meaning and practice of security unfolds. Gendering human security exposes how the security needs of individuals are also identified in relation to specific groups, which reflects the feminist understanding of humans’ relational autonomy and implies that human security is not individual but social security when gendered.

You do not currently have access to this article

Login

Please login to access the full content.

Subscribe

Access to the full content requires a subscription