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date: 01 December 2022

Early Modern Afro-Caribbean Healerslocked

Early Modern Afro-Caribbean Healerslocked

  • Pablo F. GómezPablo F. GómezDepartment of Medical History and Bioethics and Department of the History of Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Summary

In the early modern Spanish Caribbean, ritual practitioners of African descent were essential providers of health care for Caribbean people of all origins. Arriving from West and West Central Africa, Europe, and other Caribbean and New World locales, black healers were some of the most important shapers of practices related to the human body in the region. They openly performed bodily rituals of African, European, and Native American inspiration. Theirs is not a history uniquely defined by resistance or attempts at cultural survival, but rather by the creation of political and social capital through healing practices. Such a project was only possible through their exploration of and engagement with early modern Caribbean human and natural landscapes.

Subjects

  • History of the Caribbean
  • 1492–1824
  • Afro-Latin History
  • Science, Technology, and Health

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