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date: 22 April 2024

The Women of Guadalajara in Mexico’s Historylocked

The Women of Guadalajara in Mexico’s Historylocked

  • María Teresa Fernández AcevesMaría Teresa Fernández AcevesCentro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social (CIESAS)

Summary

From the War of Independence until the recognition of female suffrage in Mexico in 1953, the women of Guadalajara witnessed different forms of activism that touched upon national and local issues, causing them to take to the streets in order to defend their families, their neighborhoods, and their communities: their political and religious ideals. Their active participation upended traditional notions of femininity within the Catholic Church and the liberal state of the 19th century, as well as the postrevolutionary state (1920–1940). The tasks they undertook over this lengthy period of time were highly diversified and encompassed welfare, education, war, politics, religion, and social endeavors.

Subjects

  • History of Mexico
  • Cultural History
  • Gender and Sexuality

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