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date: 26 September 2021

Social Order and Mobility in 16th- and 17th-Century Central Mexicolocked

Social Order and Mobility in 16th- and 17th-Century Central Mexicolocked

  • Tatiana SeijasTatiana SeijasDepartment of History, The Pennsylvania State University

Summary

Mexico had an exceptionally diverse population during the 16th and 17th centuries, including Indigenous peoples of different ethnicities (in the majority), Iberians, and forced migrants from Africa and Asia, who related to one another in complex ways. Society—a group of people living in a community—was configured differently in each place, based on geographical location, local customs, property distribution, and a myriad of other factors. Faced with such different contexts, historians have tended to generalize about social organization (the way people interacted) from the perspective of the men who produced the most sources. Colonial statutes and official correspondence convey the attempts of Hapsburg officials to maintain a hierarchical social order, but property records reveal a more fluid reality. The acquisition of wealth and achievement of social status by non-Spaniards frustrated colonial ideals for a stratified society that correlated to ethnicity. The success of imperial governance, to the degree it was achieved, depended on its flexibility and how it allowed people to benefit from the colonial economy and to achieve social mobility.

Subjects

  • History of Mexico
  • 1492–1824
  • Social History
  • Colonialism and Imperialism

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