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date: 05 July 2022

Digital Resources: Piedra Rodante (Mexico’s Rolling Stone Magazine)locked

Digital Resources: Piedra Rodante (Mexico’s Rolling Stone Magazine)locked

  • Luis González-ReimannLuis González-ReimannUniversity of California, Berkeley
  •  and Eric ZolovEric ZolovDepartment of History, Stony Brook University

Summary

The short-lived Mexican countercultural magazine, Piedra Rodante (Rolling Stone), is a unique and invaluable primary source for researchers interested in the global sixties from a Latin American perspective. From December 1970 to January 1972, Piedra Rodante reproduced translated articles and interviews from Rolling Stone magazine, together with original reporting by Mexican music critics and writers on a vast array of topics relevant to youth in the context of late 1960s and early 1970s Mexico. Piedra Rodante was launched by a young advertising executive, Manuel Aceves, a follower of the US and British countercultural and rock scene. In 1971, Mexico’s own countercultural movement, known as La Onda, was bursting with artistic creativity as well as marketing potential, especially in the music industry. In the wake of the 1968 student movement, however, Mexico’s government was wary of the untethered political potential mobilized by La Onda (epitomized by the outdoor rock festival, Avándaro, held in September 1971). With little warning, the government shuttered Piedra Rodante as part of a broader suppression of La Onda throughout the culture industry. Absent a missing issue 0, this fully digitized collection of issues 1–8 is the only complete set available to the public.

Subjects

  • History of Mexico
  • 1945–1991
  • Cultural History
  • Digital Innovations, Sources, and Interdisciplinary Approaches
  • Gender and Sexuality
  • Revolutions and Rebellions

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