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date: 03 December 2022

Pidgins and Creoleslocked

Pidgins and Creoleslocked

  • John McWhorterJohn McWhorterDepartment of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University

Summary

Creole languages have mostly resulted from interactions between Europeans and subordinated peoples amid colonization, trade, and imperialism. Given that the creation of these languages was usually driven as much by adults as children, second-language acquisition has a larger effect upon creole language structures than it does under most other conditions of language change and contact. Namely, it has traditionally been supposed that creole languages begin as makeshift pidgin varieties, expanded from this into full languages. However, various creolists have proposed that most creoles did not in fact emerge in this way; some argue that creoles are relexifications of indigenous languages, while others argue that nothing distinguishes creole genesis from language contact more generally.

Subjects

  • Historical Linguistics
  • Language Families/Areas/Contact

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