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date: 18 January 2021

Attributive Compoundslocked

  • Anton Karl IngasonAnton Karl IngasonDepartment of Icelandic and Comparative Cultural Studies, University of Iceland
  •  and Einar Freyr SigurðssonEinar Freyr SigurðssonThe Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies

Summary

Attributive compounds are words that include two parts, a head and a non-head, both of which include lexical roots, and in which the non-head is interpreted as a modifier of the head. The nature of this modification is sometimes described in terms of a covert relationship R. The nature of R has been the subject of much discussion in the literature, including proposals that a finite and limited number of interpretive options are available for R, as well as analyses in which the interpretation of R is unrestricted and varies with context. The modification relationship between the parts of an attributive compound also contrasts with the interpretation of compounds in other ways because some non-heads in compounds saturate argument positions of the head, others are semantically conjoined with them, and some restrict their domain of interpretation.

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