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date: 24 November 2020

Argument Structure and Morphologylocked

  • Jim WoodJim WoodDepartment of Linguistics, Yale University
  •  and Neil MylerNeil MylerDepartment of Linguistics, Boston University

Summary

The topic “argument structure and morphology” refers to the interaction between the number and nature of the arguments taken by a given predicate on the one hand, and the morphological makeup of that predicate on the other. This domain turns out to be crucial to the study of a number of theoretical issues, including the nature of thematic representations, the proper treatment of irregularity (both morphophonological and morphosemantic), and the very place of morphology in the architecture of the grammar. A recurring question within all existing theoretical approaches is whether word formation should be conceived of as split across two “places” in the grammar, or as taking place in only one.

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