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date: 25 September 2022

Discriminative Learning and the Lexicon: NDL and LDLlocked

Discriminative Learning and the Lexicon: NDL and LDLlocked

  • Yu-Ying ChuangYu-Ying ChuangUniversity of Tübingen
  •  and R. Harald BaayenR. Harald BaayenUniversity of Tübingen

Summary

Naive discriminative learning (NDL) and linear discriminative learning (LDL) are simple computational algorithms for lexical learning and lexical processing. Both NDL and LDL assume that learning is discriminative, driven by prediction error, and that it is this error that calibrates the association strength between input and output representations. Both words’ forms and their meanings are represented by numeric vectors, and mappings between forms and meanings are set up. For comprehension, form vectors predict meaning vectors. For production, meaning vectors map onto form vectors. These mappings can be learned incrementally, approximating how children learn the words of their language. Alternatively, optimal mappings representing the end state of learning can be estimated. The NDL and LDL algorithms are incorporated in a computational theory of the mental lexicon, the ‘discriminative lexicon’. The model shows good performance both with respect to production and comprehension accuracy, and for predicting aspects of lexical processing, including morphological processing, across a wide range of experiments. Since, mathematically, NDL and LDL implement multivariate multiple regression, the ‘discriminative lexicon’ provides a cognitively motivated statistical modeling approach to lexical processing.

Subjects

  • Computational Linguistics
  • Morphology
  • Phonetics/Phonology
  • Psycholinguistics

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