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date: 30 October 2020

Permafrost-Related Geohazards and Infrastructure Construction in Mountainous Environmentslocked

  • Lukas U. ArensonLukas U. ArensonBGC Engineering Inc
  •  and Matthias JakobMatthias JakobBGC Engineering

Summary

Mountain environments, home to about 12% of the global population and covering nearly a quarter of the global land surface, create hazardous conditions for various infrastructures. The economic and ecologic importance of these environments for tourism, transportation, hydropower generation, or natural resource extraction requires that direct and indirect interactions between infrastructures and geohazards be evaluated. Construction of infrastructure in mountain permafrost environments can change the ground thermal regime, affect gravity-driven processes, impact the strength of ice-rich foundations, or result in permafrost aggradation via natural convection. The severity of impact, and whether permafrost will degrade or aggrade in response to the construction, is a function of numerous parameters including climate change, which needs to be considered when evaluating the changes in existing or formation of new geohazards. The main challenge relates to the uncertainties associated with the projections of medium- (decadal) and long-term (century-scale) climate change. A fundamental understanding of the various processes at play and a good knowledge of the foundation conditions is required to ascertain that infrastructure in permafrost environment functions as intended. Many of the tools required for identifying geohazards in the periglacial and appropriate risk management strategies are already available.

Subjects

  • Natural Disasters (Environmental Science)
  • Natural Disasters (Environmental Science)
  • Climate Change
  • Natural Disasters (Environmental Science)

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