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date: 27 October 2020

Abstract and Keywords

Proper immune function is critical to maintain homeostasis, recognize and eliminate pathogens, and promote tissue repair. Primary and secondary immune organs receive input from the autonomic nervous system and immune cells express receptors for epinephrine, norepinephrine, and/or acetylcholine. Through direct signaling the autonomic nervous system controls immune function by altering immune cell development, initiating redistribution of immune cells throughout the body, and promoting molecular pathways that shift immune cell reactivity. This neuroimmune communication allows the autonomic nervous system to shape immune function based on physiological and psychological demands.

Keywords: autonomic, sympathetic, parasympathetic, immunity, innate, adaptive, neuroimmune, immunomodulation, epinephrine, norepinephrine, acetylcholine, monocyte, granulocyte, lymphocyte, inflammation, antibodies

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