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date: 10 December 2022

Plasticity of Stepping Rhythms in the Intact and Injured Mammalian Spinal Cordlocked

Plasticity of Stepping Rhythms in the Intact and Injured Mammalian Spinal Cordlocked

  • Serge RossignolSerge RossignolM.D., Ph.D., Department of Neuroscience, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal

Summary

The spinal cord is a prime example of how the central nervous system has evolved to execute and retain movements adapted to the environment. This results from the evolution of inborn intrinsic spinal circuits modified continuously by repetitive interactions with the outside world, as well as by developing internal needs or goals. This article emphasizes the underlying neuroplastic spinal mechanisms through observations of normal animal adaptive locomotor behavior in different imposed conditions. It further explores the motor spinal capabilities after various types of lesions to the spinal cord and the potential mechanisms underlying the spinal changes occurring after these lesions, leading to recovery of function. Together, these observations strengthen the idea of the immense potential of the motor rehabilitation approach in humans with spinal cord injury since extrinsic interventions (training, pharmacology, and electrical stimulation) can modulate and optimize remnant motor functions after injury.

Subjects

  • Motor Systems

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