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date: 31 October 2020

Auditory Hair Cells and Sensory Transductionlocked

  • Jeffrey R. HoltJeffrey R. HoltBoston Children's Hospital / Harvard Medical School
  •  and Gwenaëlle S.G. GéléocGwenaëlle S.G. GéléocBoston Children's Hospital / Harvard Medical School

Summary

The organs of the vertebrate inner ear respond to a variety of mechanical stimuli: semicircular canals are sensitive to angular velocity, the saccule and utricle respond to linear acceleration (including gravity), and the cochlea is sensitive to airborne vibration, or sound. The ontogenically related lateral line organs, spaced along the sides of aquatic vertebrates, sense water movement. All these organs have a common receptor cell type, which is called the haircell, for the bundle of enlarged microvilli protruding from its apical surface. In different organs, specialized accessory structures serve to collect, filter, and then deliver these physical stimuli to the hair bundles. The proximal stimulus for all hair cells is deflection of the mechanosensitive hair bundle. Hair cells convert mechanical information contained within the temporal pattern of hair bundle deflections into electrical signals, which they transmit to the brain for interpretation.

Subjects

  • Sensory and Motor Systems

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