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date: 26 November 2022

Aging and Olfactionlocked

Aging and Olfactionlocked

  • Richard L. DotyRichard L. DotySmell and Taste Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

Summary

Decreased ability to smell is common in older persons. Some demonstrable smell loss is present in more than 50% of those 65 to 80 years of age, with up to 10% having no smell at all (anosmia). Over the age of 80, 75% exhibit some loss with up to 20% being totally anosmic. The causes of these decrements appear multifactorial and likely include altered intranasal airflow patterns, cumulative damage to the olfactory receptor cells from viruses and other environmental insults, decrements in mucosal metabolizing enzymes, closure of the cribriform plate foramina through which olfactory receptor cells axons project to the brain, loss of selectivity of receptor cells to odorants, and altered neurotransmission, including that exacerbated in some age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

Subjects

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Disorders of the Nervous System
  • Sensory Systems

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