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Article

Olivia H. Bodart, Ethan P. Glaser, Steven M. MacLean, Meifan A. Chen, and John C. Gensel

Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a life-altering event for which there is no treatment. Depending on injury location and severity, the breadth of the effects can go far past simple mobility. Primary mechanical trauma triggers a variety of secondary cellular events that exacerbate tissue loss as well as facilitate endogenous repair. A large focus of SCI research is on understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms through which these secondary responses contribute to morbidities associated with SCI. Neuroinflammation, a common response to central nervous system (CNS) insult, is central to the secondary injury cascade. In the context of SCI, the inflammatory response plays a contradictory role in recovery; immune cells release both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines at the injury site and clear debris while also causing damage to spared tissue. The major innate and adaptive immune cells that respond to SCI are neutrophils, astrocytes, microglia/macrophages, B cells, and T cells. For each cell type, the timing of the cellular response (in both human and rodent models of SCI), the potential role each cell type plays in the pathophysiology of injury, and the therapeutic implications of targeting each cell type for SCI recovery are discussed.

Article

William H. Walker II and A. Courtney DeVries

Neuroimmunology is the study of the interaction between the immune system and nervous system during development, homeostasis, and disease states. Descriptions of neuroinflammatory diseases dates back centuries. However, in depth scientific investigation in the field began in the late 19th century and continues into the 21st century. Contrary to prior dogma in the field of neuroimmunology, there is immense reciprocal crosstalk between the brain and the immune system throughout development, homeostasis, and disease states. Proper neuroimmune functioning is necessary for optimal health, as the neuroimmune system regulates vital processes including neuronal signaling, synapse pruning, and clearance of debris and pathogens within the central nervous system. Perturbations in optimal neuroimmune functioning can have detrimental consequences for the host and underlie a myriad of physical, cognitive, and behavioral abnormalities. As such, the field of neuroimmunology is still relatively young and dynamic and represents an area of active research and discovery.