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date: 25 November 2020

Cortical Processing of Odorantslocked

  • Yaniv Cohen, Yaniv CohenEmotional Brain Institute, Nathan S. Kline Institute, and Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, New York University Langone Medical Center
  • Emmanuelle Courtiol, Emmanuelle CourtiolEmotional Brain Institute, Nathan S. Kline Institute, and Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, New York University Langone Medical Center
  • Regina M. SullivanRegina M. SullivanChild & Adolescent Psychiatry, New York University Langone Medical Center, and Emotional Brain Institute, Nathan S Kline Institute
  •  and Donald A. WilsonDonald A. WilsonChild & Adolescent Psychiatry, New York University Langone Medical Center, and Emotional Brain Institute, Nathan S. Kline Institute

Summary

Odorants, inhaled through the nose or exhaled from the mouth through the nose, bind to receptors on olfactory sensory neurons. Olfactory sensory neurons project in a highly stereotyped fashion into the forebrain to a structure called the olfactory bulb, where odorant-specific spatial patterns of neural activity are evoked. These patterns appear to reflect the molecular features of the inhaled stimulus. The olfactory bulb, in turn, projects to the olfactory cortex, which is composed of multiple sub-units including the anterior olfactory nucleus, the olfactory tubercle, the cortical nucleus of the amygdala, the anterior and posterior piriform cortex, and the lateral entorhinal cortex. Due to differences in olfactory bulb inputs, local circuitry and other factors, each of these cortical sub-regions appears to contribute to different aspects of the overall odor percept. For example, there appears to be some spatial organization of olfactory bulb inputs to the cortical nucleus of the amygdala, and this region may be involved in the expression of innate odor hedonic preferences. In contrast, the olfactory bulb projection to the piriform cortex is highly distributed and not spatially organized, allowing the piriform to function as a combinatorial, associative array, producing the emergence of experience-dependent odor-objects (e.g., strawberry) from the molecular features extracted in the periphery. Thus, the full perceptual experience of an odor requires involvement of a large, highly dynamic cortical network.

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