Show Summary Details

Page of

Printed from Oxford Research Encyclopedias, Politics. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a single article for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 19 April 2024

The Convention on the Rights of Persons With Disabilities as a Global Tipping Point for the Participation of Persons With Disabilitieslocked

The Convention on the Rights of Persons With Disabilities as a Global Tipping Point for the Participation of Persons With Disabilitieslocked

  • Paul HarpurPaul Harpurp.harpur@law.uq.edu.au Associate Professor and ARC Future Fellow, TC Beirne School of Law, at the University of Queensland. Affiliated Fellow, Harvard Law School Project on Disability. International Distinguished Fellow, the Burton Blatt Institute, Syracuse University. ORCiD ID: 0000-0002-3350-0381
  •  and Michael Ashley SteinMichael Ashley Steinmastein@law.harvard.edu Professor, Harvard Law School. Co-founder and Executive Director of the Harvard Law School Project on Disability. ORCiD ID: 0000-0001-9564-7461

Summary

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is a historical tipping point, globally precipitating and enabling persons with disabilities to exercise their rights. Prior to the CRPD, laws and practices restricted the capacity of persons with disabilities to be present, let alone empowered, within society. By contrast, leveraging the call of “nothing about us without us,” the disability rights movement precipitated a participatory dynamic throughout the CRPD’s drafting sessions. Disabled peoples’ organizations (DPOs), as nongovernmental organizations, selected their own spokespeople, attended all public meetings, made statements, received copies of official documents, and distributed their own position papers. This involvement has had profound and continuing lasting effects, with participation enshrined in the CRPD’s text and precipitating a new global norm. The CRPD requires full and effective participation and inclusion in society and equality of opportunity. It further requires states to closely consult with and involve persons with disabilities, through DPOs, in decisions, policies, and laws affecting them and to promote DPO development. DPOs are also authorized to implement and monitor the CRPD, thereby facilitating the work of the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which to date has been dominated by independent experts with disabilities. Collectively, these requirements are intended to ensure that persons with disabilities can fully participate in the CRPD’s visionary agenda.

Subjects

  • Groups and Identities
  • Political Institutions

Updated in this version

The title, introduction, main text, and references have been significantly updated and expanded to reflect the latest developments.

You do not currently have access to this article

Login

Please login to access the full content.

Subscribe

Access to the full content requires a subscription