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date: 19 April 2021

Social Network Influence on Political Behavior in Religious Contextslocked

  • Christina Ladam, Christina LadamDepartment of Political Science, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Ian ShapiroIan ShapiroDepartment of Political Science, University of Colorado Boulder
  •  and Anand SokheyAnand SokheyDepartment of Political Science, University of Colorado

Summary

As the most common form of voluntary association in America, houses of worship remain an unquestionably critical component of American civil society. Major approaches to studying religion and politics in the United States are described, and the authors present an argument for focusing more attention on the organizational experience provided by religious contexts: studying how individuals’ social networks intersect with their associational involvements (i.e., studying religion from a “interpersonal” perspective) may actually shed new light on intrapersonal, psychological constructs like identity and religiosity.

Evidence is presented from two nationally representative data sets that suggests considerable variance in the degree to which individuals’ core social networks overlap with their houses of worship. This variance exists within and between individuals identifying with major religious traditions, and such networks are not characterized solely by agreement (as theories of self-selection might suggest).

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