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date: 09 December 2022

Religious Communication and Persuasionlocked

Religious Communication and Persuasionlocked

  • Benjamin R. KnollBenjamin R. KnollDepartment of Politics, Centre College
  •  and Cammie Jo BolinCammie Jo BolinDepartment of Government, Georgetown University

Summary

Religious communication affects political behavior through two primary channels: political messages coming from a religious source and religious messages coming from a political source. In terms of the first channel, political scientists have found that clergy do tend to get involved in politics, and church-goers often hear political messages over the pulpit, although not as frequently as might be expected. Sometimes these political messages are successful in swaying opinions, but not always; context matters a great deal. In terms of the second channel, politicians use religious rhetoric (“God talk”) in an attempt to increase their support and win votes. When this happens, some groups are more likely to respond than others, including political conservatives, more frequent church attenders, and racial/ethnic minorities. The scope and effectiveness of religious communication remains a field ripe for further research, especially in contexts outside of the United States.

Subjects

  • Groups and Identities
  • Political Behavior
  • Political Communication
  • Political Sociology
  • Political Values, Beliefs, and Ideologies
  • Public Opinion
  • Quantitative Political Methodology

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