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date: 19 October 2021

Mobilizing the Invisible: Power and Marginality in the Black LGBTQ Communitylocked

Mobilizing the Invisible: Power and Marginality in the Black LGBTQ Communitylocked

  • Ravi K. PerryRavi K. PerryDepartment of Political Science, Howard University
  •  and Aaron D. CampAaron D. CampDepartment of Political Science, Brandeis University

Summary

Symbolic and structural inequities that seek to maintain White supremacy have sought to render Black LGBTQ Americans invisible in the body politic of powerful institutions that govern society. In the face of centuries-long oppression at the hands of the state, Black LGBTQ Americans have effectively mobilized to establish visibility on the national policymaking agenda. Members of this community have demonstrated a fierce resilience while confronting a violent anti-Black and anti-LGBTQ mainstream agenda narrative in media and politics. This sociopolitical marginalization—from members of their shared demographic, or not, is often framed in partisan or ideological terms in public discourse and in the halls of American political institutions. Secondary marginalization theory and opinion polling frame how personal identity and social experience shape the Black LGBTQ political movement’s expression of what participation in politics in the United States ought to earn them in return. Double-consciousness theory contextualizes the development of Black LGBTQ sociopolitical marginalization in the United States and the community’s responsive mobilization over time—revealing the impact of coalition building and self-identification toward establishing political visibility necessary to improve the lived conditions of the multiply oppressed.

Subjects

  • Governance/Political Change
  • Groups and Identities
  • Political Behavior
  • Political Values, Beliefs, and Ideologies

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