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date: 07 October 2022

Conservatismlocked

Conservatismlocked

  • Torbjörn TännsjöTorbjörn TännsjöDepartment of Philosophy, Stockholm University

Summary

All conservatives have something in common, a particular argument, even if they disagree about the rationale behind this argument. The conservative argument can be stated thus: Some orders ought to be maintained because they are existing and well established. The reason given by conservatives why orders that are existing and well established ought to be maintained is varied. Typically, it has to do with pessimism with regard to the human moral nature or human rationality, or it has to do with pessimism with regard to rational argumentation combined with optimism about what has evolved historically speaking. The reasoning, then, is instrumental and pragmatic. However, there are also conservatives who claim that an existing and well-established order, such as a nation, a Volk, a species, or some cherished institution, has final value.

Subjects

  • Governance/Political Change
  • Political Philosophy

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