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date: 15 June 2024

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxietylocked

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxietylocked

  • Michelle L. Moulds, Michelle L. MouldsSchool of Psychology, UNSW Sydney
  • Jessica R. GrishamJessica R. GrishamSchool of Psychology, UNSW Sydney
  •  and Bronwyn M. GrahamBronwyn M. GrahamSchool of Psychology, UNSW Sydney

Summary

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based, structured, goal-oriented, time-limited intervention for psychological disorders. CBT integrates behavioral and cognitive principles and therapeutic strategies; practitioners and clients work collaboratively to identify patterns of behaving and thinking that contribute to the persistence of symptoms, with the goal of replacing them with more adaptive alternatives. In the treatment of anxiety problems, the primary focus of CBT is on reducing avoidance of feared stimuli (e.g., spiders) or situations (e.g., public speaking) and modifying biases in thinking (e.g., the tendency to interpret benign situations as threatening). At its broadest, CBT is an umbrella term; it describes a range of interventions targeting cognitive and behavioral processes—ranging from early, traditional CBT protocols to more recently developed approaches (e.g., mindfulness-based cognitive therapy). CBT protocols have been developed for the full range of anxiety disorders, and a strong evidence base supports their efficacy.

Subjects

  • Clinical Psychology: Disorders and Therapies

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