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date: 25 February 2024

Statistical Learninglocked

Statistical Learninglocked

  • Louisa Bogaerts, Louisa BogaertsUniversity of Ghent
  • Noam SiegelmanNoam SiegelmanYale University
  •  and Ram FrostRam FrostHebrew University of Jerusalem

Summary

Statistical learning refers to the ability to pick up on the statistical regularities in our sensory environment, typically without intention or conscious awareness. Since the seminal publication on statistical learning in 1996, sensitivity to regularities has become a key concept in our understanding of language acquisition as well as other cognitive functions such as perception and attention.

Neuroimaging studies investigating which brain areas underpin statistical learning have mapped a network of domain-general regions in the medial temporal lobe as well as modality-specific regions in early sensory cortices. Research using electroencephalography has further demonstrated how sensitivity to structure impacts the brain’s processing of sensory input.

In response to concerns about the large discrepancy between the very simplistic artificial regularities employed in laboratory experiments on statistical learning and the much noisier and more complex regularities humans face in the real world, recent studies have taken more ecological approaches.

Subjects

  • Cognitive Psychology/Neuroscience
  • Developmental Psychology
  • Methods and Approaches in Psychology

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