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date: 28 October 2020

Mixed Methods Research in Adult Development and Aginglocked

  • Joseph E. Gaugler, Joseph E. GauglerSchool of Nursing, University of Minnesota
  • Colleen M. Peterson, Colleen M. PetersonSchool of Public Health, University of Minnesota
  • Lauren L. Mitchell, Lauren L. MitchellDepartment of Psychology, University of Minnesota
  • Jessica FinlayJessica FinlayDepartment of Geography, Environment, and Society, University of Minnesota
  •  and Eric JutkowitzEric JutkowitzCenter for Gerontology and Healthcare Research, School of Public Health, Brown University

Summary

Mixed methods research consists of collecting and analyzing qualitative and quantitative data within a singular study. The “methods” of mixed methods research vary, but the ultimate goal is to provide greater understanding and explanation via the integration of qualitative and quantitative data. Mixed methods studies have the potential to advance our understanding of complex phenomena over time in adult development and aging (e.g., depression following the death of a spouse), but the utility of this approach depends on its application. The authors systematically searched the literature (CINHAL, Embase, Ovid/Medline, PubMed, PsychInfo, and ProQuest) to identify longitudinal mixed methods studies focused on aging. They identified 6,351 articles published between 1994 and 2017, of which 174 met the inclusion criteria. The majority of mixed methods studies reported on the evaluation of interventions or educational programs. Non-interventional studies tended to report on experiences related to the progression of various health conditions, the needs and experiences of caregivers, and the lived experiences of older adults. About half (n = 81) of the mixed methods studies followed a sequential explanatory design where a qualitative component followed quantitative evaluation, and most of these studies achieved “integration” by comparing qualitative and quantitative data in Results sections. There was considerable heterogeneity across studies in terms of overall design (randomized trials, program evaluations, cohort studies, and case studies). As a whole, the literature suffered from key limitations, including a lack of reporting on sample selection methodology and mixed methods design characteristics. To maximize the value of mixed methods in adult development in aging research, investigators should conform to recommended guidelines (e.g., depict participant study flow and use recommended notation) and consider more sophisticated mixed methods applications to advance the state of the art.

Subjects

  • Developmental Psychology
  • Research Methods in Psychology

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