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date: 18 April 2024

Ensuring the Public Value of Long-Term Care Serviceslocked

Ensuring the Public Value of Long-Term Care Serviceslocked

  • Joseph E. IbrahimJoseph E. IbrahimForensic Medicine, Monash University

Summary

Many seniors needing social and clinical care come from vulnerable populations that have difficulty accessing services, a great need for those services, and/or potentially impaired decision-making skills. At the same time, when seniors use services on a routine basis, they become increasingly dependent on the individual service provider. The aged care sector has a duty to provide “public value”—that is, to provide a valuable contribution to society within existing resource constraints. This requires more than simply addressing the basic individual needs of care recipients. Ethical factors must be considered in policies around services to vulnerable seniors and potential issues in addressing suboptimal quality of care, neglect, and abuse of seniors, as demonstrated by continuing public news of poor care provided to seniors in nursing homes, social care, and residential care settings.

Subjects

  • Health Services Administration/Management
  • Public Health Policy and Governance
  • Special Populations

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