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date: 28 June 2022

Climate Change Impacts on Diarrheal Disease, From Epidemiological Association Research to Social Vulnerability Explorationlocked

Climate Change Impacts on Diarrheal Disease, From Epidemiological Association Research to Social Vulnerability Explorationlocked

  • Junfeng Yu, Junfeng YuSchool of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University
  • Lianping Yang, Lianping YangSchool of Public Health, Sun Yat-Sen University
  • Hung Chak HoHung Chak HoDepartment of Urban Planning and Design, The University of Hong Kong
  •  and Cunrui HuangCunrui HuangSchool of Public Health, Sun Yat-Sen University

Summary

Climate change has resulted in rising global average temperatures and an increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events, which already has and will yield serious public health consequences, including the risk of diarrheal diseases. Sufficient evidence in the literature has highlighted the association between different meteorological variables and diarrhea incidence. Both low and high temperatures can increase the incidence of diarrheal disease, and heavy rainfall has also been associated with increased diarrhea cases. Extreme precipitation events and floods are often followed by diarrhea outbreaks. Research has also concluded that drought can concentrate pathogens in water sources, which makes it possible for diarrhea pathogens to distribute broadly when the first heavy rain happens. Substantial evidence underscores the important role social, behavioral, and environmental factors may have for the climate-diarrhea relationship. Meteorological factors may further influence the social vulnerability of populations to diarrhea through a variety of social and behavioral factors. Future research should focus on social factors, population vulnerability, and further understanding of how climate change affects diarrhea to contribute to the development of targeted adaptation strategies.

Subjects

  • Environmental Health

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