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date: 01 October 2022

Migrant Health in Refugee Camps: A Neglected Public Health Issuelocked

Migrant Health in Refugee Camps: A Neglected Public Health Issuelocked

  • Manuela ValentiManuela ValentiEMERGENCY Ong Onlus

Summary

There are 1 billion migrants in the world today, which means that one in seven of the world’s population are migrants. Of these, 272 million are international migrants and 763 million are internal migrants. It is estimated that around 70 million of the world’s migrants, both internal and international, have been forcibly displaced.

Many things force people to leave their homes in search of a better future: war, poverty, persecution, climate change, desertification, urbanization, globalization, inequality, and lack of job prospects. Migrants remain among the most vulnerable members of society even when their living conditions improve after migration.

Migrant women and children are a particularly vulnerable group and have a great need for basic and preventive health care.

Many refugees and migrants are young and in good health, but hard living conditions and difficulty accessing basic health care can affect their state of health. Many of them face inhuman journeys during migration and live in refugee camps with very low standards of hygiene; when they find a job, they are often exploited. All these things can also affect their mental health.

Migrants struggle with similar challenges as other marginalized groups when it comes to access to health care, but they face the additional barriers of mobility, language barriers, cultural differences, lack of familiarity with local health care services, and limited eligibility for publicly and privately funded health care.

Governments should provide affordable preventive and basic health care to refugees and migrants not only because it is a human right but also because in the long term it can lower the costs of the whole health care system.

Subjects

  • Epidemiology
  • Global Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Non-communicable Diseases
  • Public Health Policy and Governance
  • Special Populations

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