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date: 30 October 2020

Empowerment Practicelocked

  • Ruth J. ParsonsRuth J. ParsonsUniversity of Denver
  •  and Jean EastJean EastUniversity of Denver

Summary

The concept of empowerment has deep roots in social work practice. Building upon the work of empowerment theorists of the 1980s and 1990s and applied broadly in the 2000s [Itzhaky and York (2000), Social Work Research, 24, 225–234; Travis and Deepak (2011), Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Diversity in Social Work, 20, 203–222], the concept of empowerment has evolved from a philosophical level to practice frameworks and methods. Substantial research confirms empowerment outcomes as personal, interpersonal, and sociopolitical. Practice interventions contain both personal and structural dimensions and are accomplished through multilevel interventions. Based on transformation ideology, empowerment is a counter to perceived and objective powerlessness. Social work relationships provide an opportunity for experiencing power and collaboration. Empowerment interventions are often useful with vulnerable populations, such as women and members of stigmatized groups.

Subjects

  • Direct Practice and Clinical Social Work
  • Practical Ethics
  • Social Work Practice Settings
  • Social Work Research and Evidence-based Practice
  • Social Justice and Human Rights

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