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date: 23 October 2019

Abstract and Keywords

Harm reduction is a helping strategy that attempts to alleviate the social, legal, and medical consequences associated with unmanaged addiction, and in so doing, limit the harms, such as infectious disease (HIV, hepatitis), violence, criminal activity, and early death, without necessarily attempting to “cure” the addiction. While abstinence may be an ideal outcome from a harm reduction standpoint, abstinence is viewed as only one of several means of improving a person's life. Harm reduction strategies are well known in the U.S. through methadone maintenance and syringe-exchange programs, and are increasingly relied on in the treatment of co-existing disorders.

Keywords: harm reduction, addiction treatment, client self-determination, co-existing disorders, assertive community treatment, drug policy

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