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date: 30 October 2020

Immigration Policylocked

  • Uma A. SegalUma A. SegalUniversity of Missouri–St. Louis

Summary

Individuals and families from around the globe form a continuous stream of immigrants to the United States, with waiting lists for entry stretching to several years. Reasons for this ongoing influx are readily apparent, because the United States is one of the most attractive nations in the world, regardless of its problems. There is much in the United States that native-born Americans take for granted and that is not available in most other countries, and there are several amenities, opportunities, possibilities, lifestyles, and freedoms in the United States (U.S.) that are not found together in any other nation. In theory, and often in reality, the U.S. is a land of freedom, of equality, of opportunity, of a superior quality of life, of easy access to education, and of relatively few human rights violations. This entry will focus on immigration policy through legislative history and its impact, demographic trends, the economic impact, the immigrant workforce, educational and social service systems, ethical issues, and roles for social workers.

Subjects

  • International and Global Issues in Social Work
  • Social Policy and Advocacy
  • Social Work Practice Settings
  • Race and Ethnicity
  • Social Justice and Human Rights

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