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date: 27 October 2020

Abortionlocked

  • D. Lynn JacksonD. Lynn JacksonUniversity of North Texas

Summary

Until the 19th century, abortion law was nonexistent and abortion was not seen as a moral issue. However, by the turn of the 20th century, abortion was legally defined and controlled in most states. The landmark Supreme Court case, Roe v. Wade (1973), marked the legalization of abortion but did not end the controversy that existed. Legislation at both the federal and state levels has added restrictions on abortion, making it difficult for women to exercise their reproductive rights. Social work's commitment to promote the human rights of women compels social workers to be aware of and involved in this issue.

Subjects

  • Practical Ethics
  • Health, Illness, and Medicine
  • Social Justice and Human Rights

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