Show Summary Details

Page of

Printed from Encyclopedia of Social Work. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a single article for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

date: 27 November 2020

Progressive Social Worklocked

  • Rosemary Barbera, Rosemary BarberaSchool of Arts and Sciences, La Salle University
  • Mary Bricker-JenkinsMary Bricker-JenkinsTemple University, Professor Emeritus
  •  and Barbara Hunter-Randall JosephBarbara Hunter-Randall JosephCollege at Old Westbury, State University of New York

Summary

Since the beginning of the profession, progressive social work has been characterized by a lived commitment to practice dedicated to advancing human rights and social and economic justice. Since the mid-1980s, the rise of global capitalism has vitiated support for robust social welfare programs and has had a conservatizing effect on the profession, rendering the progressive agenda both more urgent and more difficult. Since the economic crisis of 2008, with a rise in people suffering, while at the same time those programs that would help ease that suffering have been cut back, further perpetuating the myth that austerity is the cure for the disease that it has caused. Progressive social work has responded to both challenges with innovation and energy, but theoretical and practical conundrums remain. This article is offered as an effort to discuss and define progressive social work and its connection to social work values with the hope of contributing to advancing social work practice that addresses social injustices and human rights violations.

You do not currently have access to this article

Login

Please login to access the full content.

Subscribe

Access to the full content requires a subscription