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Article

Clarissa (Clara) Harlowe Barton (1821–1912) was the founder of the American Red Cross and its president from 1881 to 1904. She introduced the “American Amendment,” ensuring that the Red Cross would provide relief in peacetime as well as in war.

Article

Sadye L. M. Logan

As chief executive director of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), Battle demonstrated a pioneering leadership that stimulated the organization and the social work profession to broader areas of social concerns. He was a social worker, educator, consultant, businessman, and former government official. Throughout his career, he blended expertise in management and labor issues with social work skills and knowledge.

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Paul H. Ephross

William D. Bechill (1928–2007) was a social worker who raised public and governmental consciousness about the needs of older Americans. He was responsible for the original design of the Medi–Cal legislation in California, which anticipated much of the Federal Medicare.

Article

Kenneth S. Carpenter

Bertram Beck (1918–2000) was a social worker who contributed to juvenile delinquency prevention and held many leadership positions in social work organizations. At Fordham University he was instrumental in creating the managed care institute and the religion and poverty institute.

Article

Jean K. Quam

Clifford Whittingham Beers (1876–1943) helped establish the American Foundation for Mental Hygiene and the International Foundation for Mental Hygiene. His work helped broaden knowledge of the causes, treatment, and prevention of mental illness.

Article

Philip Mendes

Connie Benn (1926–2011) was a prominent Australian social work practitioner, researcher, and social activist. As a leader of the Australian Association of Social Workers in the 1960s, she encouraged social workers to move beyond a narrow focus on casework to participate in broader movements for social reform. In the early 1970s, she led the Brotherhood of St Laurence’s Family Centre Project, which pioneered the application of structural social work methods to assisting a group of disadvantaged families.

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Teri Pichot

Insoo Kim Berg, MSW (1934–2007), along with her husband, Steve de Shazer, was a primary developer of solution-focused brief therapy. She was a prolific author as well as a gifted clinician who traveled around the world inspiring and training professionals in this unique model.

Article

Kenneth S. Carpenter

Margaret Berry (1915–2002) was Executive Director of the National Conference on Social Welfare from 1972 to 1979. She was actively involved in developing group work activities on an international basis.

Article

Wilma Peebles-Wilkins

Mary McLeod Bethune (1875–1955) was a teacher committed to the education and development of Black women. Her role as president of the National Association of Colored Women led to the founding of the National Council of Negro Women in 1935.

Article

James Midgley

Lord William Beveridge (1879–1963) was one of the founders of the British welfare state. His report of 1942 formed the basis for the Labour Government's social policies between 1945 and 1950 and fostered the creation of Britain's national health services.

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Sadye L. M. Logan

Jane Elizabeth Bierdeman-Fike (1922–2012) was a state and national leader in developing forensic social work practice and was committed to providing best practices to an oppressed population of patients with mental illness who were residents in psychiatric institutions.

Article

Margaret Daniel

Eileen Blackey (1902–1979) was a social worker and consultant who helped establish schools of social work in Hawaii and at Hebrew University in Israel. She was Dean of the School of Social Work at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Article

Frances Feldman and Haluk Soydan

Emory Bogardus (1882–1973) established the first Sociology Department in the West in 1915. His study on “social distance” is still used to examine cultural, ethnic, and religious attitudes. In 1920 he founded Alpha Kappa Delta, the sociology honor society.

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Faye Mishna and Cheryl Regehr

Marion Bogo (1942–2021), Professor in the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, was a preeminent Canadian scholar and world-renowned expert who transformed social work education and practice in Canada and across the globe. Over a 4-decade-long career, Bogo instituted major innovations in social work practice education including developing a holistic model of competence and cutting-edge simulation-based educational practices. Bogo had a profound influence on preparing generations of social workers and educators.

Article

Carole Zugazaga

Ivan Böszörményi-Nagy (1920–2007) was a Hungarian-American psychiatrist and one of the founders of the field of family therapy. He emigrated from Hungary to the United States in 1950.

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Jean K. Quam

Charles Loring Brace (1826–1890) was a writer, minister, and social reformer. He worked with homeless children, initiating child welfare services, and was the founder and executive director of the Children's Aid Society of New York City.

Article

Stephen Holloway

George Brager (1922–2003) was a social work educator, administrator, and social activist who worked primarily in New York City. He developed innovative community programs which had national impact and was a founding director of Mobilization for Youth.

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Sadye L. M. Logan

Martha Elizabeth Branscombe’s (1906–1997) illustrious career in services to children and families expanded over three decades. Her exemplary leadership was at the local, national, and international levels.

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Sophonisba Preston Breckinridge (1866–1948) was an educator and social activist, based in Chicago. She taught the first course in public welfare administration and developed a postgraduate curriculum in social work, introducing the case method as the mode of instruction.

Article

Jennifer Briar-Bonpane and Katharine Briar-Lawson

Scott Briar (1926–1998) was a practitioner, researcher, scholar, and leader who championed research-informed practice and helped shape modern casework. He was Dean of Washington School of Social Work, edited Social Work, and served as a reviewer for NIMH.