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Article

Tanya Smith Brice

Shirley Chisholm (1924–2005) was a political leader and activist best known as the first African American woman elected to the US House of Representatives and the first African American to seek the Democratic Party nomination for US President.

Article

Tor Slettebø

As a feminist, social worker, administrator, educator, researcher, writer, and editor Kikkan Ustvedt Christiansen (1932–2020) was one of the pioneers in developing social work as a professional practice into an academic discipline and research field in Norway. Even when she ended her career as a respected researcher in child welfare, she never surrendered her identity as a practitioner and engagement for social justice.

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Tanya Smith Brice

Jay Carrington Chunn, II, (1938–2013), was a leader in social work education, a professor, and an author who focused on public health and policy within urban populations.

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Sadye L. M. Logan

Elizabeth J. Clark (1944–2020) was an author, speaker, and hope advocate. She was a healthcare professional who worked extensively with cancer survivors, those facing life-challenging illnesses, and those struggling with loss and grief. Clark grew up in Lock Haven, Pennsylvania. She earned multiple degrees from the University of Pittsburgh, the University of North Carolina, and Wartburg College. She served as chief executive officer of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) for over a decade and was a member of the Academy of Certified Social Workers (ACSW), the National Academies of Practice (NAP), and the international work group on Death, Dying and Bereavement.

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Brenda K. J. Crawley

Septima Poinsetta Clark (1898–1987) is well-known for her citizenship schools, literacy training, voting and civil rights activism, and community, political, and social services.

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Alex Gitterman

Richard Cloward (1926–2005) was an internationally renowned scholar, social activist, and educator at Columbia University. His scholarship on contemporary issues in the US was informed by his social activism on the frontlines, organizing for welfare rights and voter registration.

Article

Roland L. Guyotte

Wilbur Cohen (1913–1987) was secretary of the US Department of Health, Education, and Welfare and chief architect of Medicare and Medicaid. He drafted the Social Security Act and, from the 1930s to the 1980s, developed its scope and defended it from cutbacks.

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Sadye L. M. Logan

Joan Bonner Conway’s (1920–2008) career in social work spanned over four decades. Her practice and administrative skills included large and small hospitals and rehabilitation settings. Through her pioneering efforts in these settings she was able to make significant contributions to the social work specialty of medical social work.

Article

Carole Zugazaga

Catherine “Kate” Courtney (née Potter), Baroness Courtney of Penwirth (1847–1929), was a British social worker, political activist, and suffragist who actively campaigned for world peace.

Article

Dionne V. Frank

Frederick Augustus Salvador Cox (April 15, 1944–July 12, 2009) was a teacher, social worker, and lay minister who campaigned for sexual and reproductive rights, advocated for the preservation of the family, and worked tirelessly to encourage men to play a meaningful role in society. Born on April 15, 1944, in the rural community of Freetown, Pomeroon, Guyana, Frederick moved to the capital city, Georgetown, where he trained as a teacher and social worker. He contributed to Guyana’s social development in many ways, including as a principal (Sophia Special School), president (Guyana Association of Professional Social Workers), chairman (Medical Termination of Pregnancy Board) as the longest serving executive director of the Guyana Responsible Parenthood Association and a lay minister with the Church of the Transfiguration. Apart from maintaining an active public profile and addressing various social issues, Frederick gained national attention hosting Social Work and You, a weekly radio program. His activism and contributions were such that in paying tribute to him on his death on July 12, 2009, then Minister of Health Dr. Leslie Ramsammy told the media that Frederick Cox was an asset who would be difficult to replace. Indeed, since the passing of this consummate social worker, Guyana has not seen another male of his caliber assume a public role to advocate for sexual and reproductive health and women’s rights.

Article

Jean K. Quam

Grace Longwell Coyle (1892–1962) was the first to develop a scientific approach to group work practice. She was president of the National Conference of Social Work, the American Association of Social Workers, and the Council of Social Work Education.

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Sadye L. M. Logan

Margaret Daniel (1908–1997) provided outstanding leadership and left an indelible mark on the social work profession in both social work education and practice through her work at the Veterans’ Administration (VA) and through her contributions at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), leading to high standards in social work education.

Article

Allan Moscovitch

George Davidson’s (1909–1995) working life included four careers over a period of over 45 years. In his first two careers he was director of welfare in the government of British Columbia, executive director of the Canadian Welfare Council, and then the government of Canada’s first deputy minister of welfare. In his later careers he was president of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and undersecretary general of the United Nations.

Article

Shaun M. Eack and Valire C. Copeland

Larry E. Davis was a pioneering scholar and educator in social work and psychology who dedicated his professional life to understanding the social dynamics of race and their impact on the lives of racial and ethnic minorities. An ardent author and teacher, Dr. Davis published extensively on social work practice with multiracial groups and approaches to support African American families, and consistently strived to educate the field on the complexities of culturally competent social work practice. In 2002, he started the University of Pittsburgh Center on Race and Social Problems, the first center of its kind in any school of social work, which became internationally recognized as a leading social science research center and a beacon for scholarship on race. Due to his considerable accomplishments, Dr. Davis was the first to be recognized with lifetime achievement awards in both social work education and research by the Council on Social Work Education and Society for Social Work and Research.

Article

Ann Weick

Liane V. Davis (1942–1995) was an advocate, scholar and teacher, and promoter of women's issues in social work. She chaired the National Committee on Women's Issues and taught and wrote about women's victimization and how to support their strengths.

Article

Jean K. Quam

Dorothy Day (1897–1980) was a social activist, journalist, and publisher who wrote several books and engaged in many demonstrations. She was co-founder of the Catholic Worker Movement and edited the Catholic Worker for more than 40 years.

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Jean K. Quam

Robert Weeks De Forest (1848–1931) was a lawyer, philanthropist, and social reformer. He is credited with developing the New York School of Philanthropy and the Russell Sage Foundation. He was the president of the New York City Charity Organization Society from 1881 to 1931.

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Yolanda Ealdama

Petra de Joya (1913–1987) was an eminent educator and social administrator. She spearheaded the professionalization of social work in the Philippines by advocating for the passage of laws that were instrumental for the development of social work in the country. The following laws were enacted as a result of her advocacy: (a) Republic Act regulating the social work profession in the Philippines and requiring social welfare agencies to hire professional social workers; (b) a Republic Act elevating the Department of Social Work to the Institute of Social Work and Community Development at the University of the Philippines; and (c) a Republic Act transforming the Social Welfare Administration (SWA) into the Department of Social Welfare (DSW). She was appointed as one of the first board of examiners for social work.

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Sadye L. M. Logan

Ronald Vernie Dellums, MSW (1935–2018), enjoyed a long and distinguished career as a compassionate social worker, a congressman who campaigned for international peace and disarmament, and an innovative businessman with a focus on healthcare. He served in numerous leadership positions both nationally and internationally. Although essentially thought of as a leader in the defense and foreign policy fields, he also distinguished himself with domestic legislative initiatives.

Article

Teri Pichot

Steve de Shazer, MSW (1940–2005) along with his wife, Insoo Kim Berg, was a primary developer of solution-focused brief therapy (SFBT). He was a prolific writer as well as a gifted clinician, researcher, and trainer. He dedicated his life to describing and understanding what caused positive change for clients and ensuring that SFBT gained the credibility necessary to become an evidenced-based practice.