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Article

Jean K. Quam

Edward T. Devine(1867–1948) was a writer, educator, and administrator. As general secretary of the New York Charity Organization Society, he formed the Wayfarer's Lodge and the Tenement House Committee. He was Director of the New York School of Philanthropy.

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Sadye L. M. Logan

Miriam Goldforb Dinerman (1925–2010) served on the faculty of Rutgers University School of Social Work (RUSSW) for 31 years and helped to codify health concentration as a significant area of social work practice. She understood early in her career the interdisciplinary nature of the different health and social work professions and worked to educate students in all disciplines about the value of the others.

Article

Jean K. Quam

Dorothea Lynde Dix (1802–1887) was a writer and pioneer in the mental health movement. She lobbied national and internationally on behalf of the deaf and insane and was responsible for the establishment of 32 public and private mental health institutions.

Article

Wilma Peebles-Wilkins

W. E. B. Du Bois (1882–1973) was a Black scholar, writer, and militant civil rights activist. He actively fought against discrimination in all aspects of American life. He founded the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1909 and edited The Crisis, the organizational magazine he founded in 1910.

Article

Nancy Boyd Webb

James R. Dumpson (1909–2012) was the first African American dean of a non-black school of social work following a career in public service in New York where he worked tirelessly to promote social change and implement social justice.

Article

Jean K. Quam

Arthur Dunham (1893–1980) was a pacifist, writer, and social work educator. He wrote extensively about community development and social welfare administration. His writing contributed to the evolution of community organization as a social work method.

Article

Constance W. Williams

Rosemary Ferguson Dybwad (1910–1992) was writer and social work activist. She brought together nationally organized groups of parents of children with intellectual limitations. She was responsible for the International League of Societies for Persons with Mental Handicap and the International Directory of Mental Retardation Resources.

Article

Carrie J. Smith

Ophelia Settle Egypt (1903–1984) was a pioneer in family planning among economically disadvantaged African Americans. She is best known for her work in planned parenthood through her efforts at the Parklands Planned Parenthood Clinic in Washington, DC, from 1956 to 1968.

Article

Jean K. Quam

Martha May Eliot (1891–1978) was an educator and public health official. She was the first woman president of the American Public Health Association. She became chief medical consultant for UNICEF in 1947. She was later assistant director general of WHO, and the U.S. representative to the executive board of UNICEF.

Article

Richard Hoefer

Dr. Doreen Elliott (1941–2018) earned her bachelor of arts from Queen Mary University of London; a postgraduate certificate in education from the University of Hull, England, Institute of Education; her advance diploma in the educational rehabilitation of young people from the University of London, England, Institute of Education; and her doctoral degree from the University of Wales, United Kingdom, School of Social Work, University College Cardiff, UK. Elliott became a faculty member at the University of Wales in the field of social work and worked as a visiting associate professor at the University of Texas at Arlington for the 1986–1987 academic year. The University of Texas at Arlington became her home institution, first as Associate Professor (1988–1992) and then, from 1992 until retirement in 2013, as Professor.

Article

Sadye L. M. Logan

Paul Hullman Ephross (1935–2017) served as professor for over two decades on the faculty of the University of Maryland, Baltimore School of Social Work (UMB SSW). He retired in 2008. He was a popular, creative, and innovative teacher who excelled at experiential-based teaching. Through his research and scholarly publications he made a significant contribution to the knowledge base in the profession.

Article

Maryann Syers

Abraham Epstein (1892–1942) was an economist, educator, and writer. He was a leader in the post-World War I movement for passage of social security legislation. In 1927 he founded the American Association for Old Age Security (later the American Association for Social Security).

Article

Jeanne C. Marsh

Laura Epstein (1914–1996) was a social worker, writer, and academic. She developed the task centered treatment method of social work intervention. Her search for more humane and effective therapies has influenced many students, practitioners, and clients.

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Norma D. Thomas

Natalya Estemirova (1958–2009) was a human rights activist, a journalist, and a teacher who was abducted and killed in 2009 after working on stories of human rights abuses by the Russian government in Chechnya.

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Phylis J. Peterman

Rawle Farley, PhD (1922–2010), economist, scholar, academician, and advocate; known for his groundbreaking work in the study of economics in developing nations.

Article

Karen Smith Rotabi

Sattareh Farman Farmaian (1921–2012) founded the Tehran School of Social Work in Iran.

Article

Maryann Syers

Fedele Fauri (1909–1981) was a specialist in social legislation and public welfare in the United States. He was dean of the University of Michigan School of Social Work for nearly 20 years and helped found the school's doctoral program which combined social work and the social sciences.

Article

Dean Pierce

Ronald Federico (1941–1992) was a teacher, program administrator, and scholar. He was a leader in the development of undergraduate social work education. He provided curriculum consultation to countless social work education programs and was a mentor to many undergraduate social work educators.

Article

Sadye L. M. Logan

Frances Lomas Feldman (1912–2008), Professor Emerita at University of Southern California (USC) School of Social Work, was an indomitable force in the social work profession. Her primary research focus was the social and psychological meanings of work and money in American life. She will be remembered for her compassion and for establishing a standard of best practice to families that protected their dignity and supported their inner strengths when seeking aid.

Article

Wilma Peebles-Wilkins

Sarah Fernandis (1863–1951) was a civic leader and organizer of public health activities in Black communities. She founded the first black social settlement in the United States. In 1920, she became the first Black social worker employed in the City Venereal Disease Clinic of the Baltimore Health Department.