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Tatsuru Akimoto

A Christian social reformer, evangelist, and leader of social movements, Toyohiko Kagawa’s work spanned a wide range; he led advocacy work in urban slum settlements, argued for the betterment of the welfare of children and women, and was involved in the cooperative movement, the labor movement, the farmers’ movement, and the peace movement. His direct field of practice was mainly in Japan and later social movements in the country have been said to owe their existence to his achievements one way or another. His philosophical thoughts and ideas, however, went far beyond the borders of Japan. His ideas on the cooperative movement were welcomed by President Roosevelt, his nonviolence/pacifist thinking was once mentioned along with those of Gandhi and Schweitzer and his ideas on cooperation also interested early leaders of the European Union.

Article

Diana M. DiNitto and Lori K. Holleran Steiker

Elizabeth C. (Beth) Pomeroy, PhD, was a social work practitioner, educator, and researcher known for her work on social work assessment, diagnosis of mental disorders, and practice in the areas of grief and loss, HIV/AIDS, and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

Article

Goutham Menon

Michael Stokely Kelly (1968–2021), who served as Lucian Welch and Carol Matusak Endowed Chair at Loyola University, has left a lasting legacy in the students and colleagues whom he has inspired and mentored. He was an innovative, forward-thinking, master teacher-scholar in the field of school social work.

Article

Faye Mishna and Cheryl Regehr

Marion Bogo (1942–2021), Professor in the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, was a preeminent Canadian scholar and world-renowned expert who transformed social work education and practice in Canada and across the globe. Over a 4-decade-long career, Bogo instituted major innovations in social work practice education including developing a holistic model of competence and cutting-edge simulation-based educational practices. Bogo had a profound influence on preparing generations of social workers and educators.

Article

Kana Matsuo

Takayuki Namae (1867–1957) was a Christian social worker and professor who contributed significantly to social welfare work, education, and policies in Japan before World War II. After his studies at the New York School of Philanthropy and Boston University, Namae returned to Japan in 1904, despite several struggles, where he became a commissioned officer for the Japanese government, responsible for the development of major social work programs. During this time, he visited the United States, the United Kingdom, Denmark, New Zealand, and other countries to study their approach to social work and policies, and thereafter, he introduced these good practices in Japan. Namae maintained a humanitarian view in his development of social work policies. He dedicated his life to solving social issues in urban areas, protecting women and children, and supporting the poor. Ultimately, Takayuki Namae pioneered the indigenization of social work in Japan.

Article

Yasuhiro Kuroki

A Japanese social work educator and researcher, Tatsuo Wakabayashi was one of the founders and developers of the Japanese Association of Schools of Social Work (JASSW). Wakabayashi had a broad perspective and a solid ability to see the future of the times. He contributed to the development of social work theory and research in Japan.

Article

Nigel Hall

Father Ted Rogers was a remarkable and committed Jesuit priest who was instrumental in founding the first school of social work in the southern African country of Zimbabwe, then named Rhodesia. He remained as the Principal of the School of Social Work for 21 years and contributed to social development and poverty relief activities. Throughout his life, Fr. Rogers saw it as a priority to work in areas of urgent social need and in tackling social injustice. In later years he was known and respected in southern Africa for his contribution to the effort to fight HIV/AIDS and his work toward peace and reconciliation.

Article

Yasuhiro Kuroki

Yamamuro (1872–1940) was one of Japan’s leading popular evangelists. He contributed to the founding and development of the Salvation Army in Japan. During his lifetime, he also established various social welfare facilities and played a major role in improving social welfare activities in Japan.

Article

Philip Mendes

Connie Benn (1926–2011) was a prominent Australian social work practitioner, researcher, and social activist. As a leader of the Australian Association of Social Workers in the 1960s, she encouraged social workers to move beyond a narrow focus on casework to participate in broader movements for social reform. In the early 1970s, she led the Brotherhood of St Laurence’s Family Centre Project, which pioneered the application of structural social work methods to assisting a group of disadvantaged families.

Article

Karene-Anne Nathaniel

Audrey Layne Jeffers (1898–1968) was an early feminist of African descent with a commitment to the advancement of Black women, education of girls, services to children with disabilities, and government responsibility for social welfare. She mobilized young women to form the Coterie of Social Workers in Trinidad that began a meal program for underprivileged school children in the 1920s, which shaped the National School Feeding Program that today offers free meals to all school students. This led to the establishment of other similar facilities in other parts of the country, as well as the opening of homes for dispossessed young women, the elderly, and the blind, and daycare facilities to help working women. These facilities form the backdrop for the practice of social work in the Caribbean. She was instrumental in the hosting of the first women’s conference which made numerous recommendations including equal opportunities for women and women in the police service. She was the first woman to be elected to local government, and later nominated to the legislative council by the governor. Jeffers was a champion for disadvantaged women and girls, but notably opened the door for women in politics in the English-speaking Caribbean.